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This article was written on 16 Jan 2012, and is filled under Interviews, Music Chats.

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Kate Nash: Feminism, Sexism In The Music Industry & Empowering Young Women

I recently had the pleasure of speaking to UK musician Kate Nash. We spoke about music, feminism, sexism, online criticism, empowering young women, zines, her Rock N Roll For Girls After School Club, Brazil, Dubai … a whole load more, as well! Here’s a snippet of our conversation:

I know that you’re really proud to call yourself a feminist, a feminist through your own experiences; what does being a feminist mean to you?

KN: It’s extremely important to me. I grew up with my mum being a very strong and opinionated woman as a main influence when I was younger. She introduced me to the ideas of feminism. Feminism to me is something that becomes more real, more palatable and important to you when you really experience sexism; you grow up a bit and you’re taken out of the bubble and you know that it’s still really present. Being in the music industry really opened my eyes to it, in a really simple way at first. I was the only girl in the room all of the time until I really searched for more female company.

I think that the media is totally sexist. I think a lot of people are, without realising. The structures of society are built on these sexist ideas that have been around for hundreds and thousands of years. It’s not something that’s easy to change. I feel like there are way more extreme versions of it in places like Afghanistan, places like that that.

I read this really disgusting article about a woman who reported a rape – she was raped by her husband’s cousin – and they imprisoned her. The family of the guy that raped her threatened to kill her because she brought shame on their family. She put shame on their family! She fell pregnant because of the rape and she was given an option of staying in prison or if she came out of prison, marrying the guy that raped her to legitimise her kid. In Afghanistan if you don’t have proof of the father’s ID you just don’t exist as a person, which is just crazy. It means you can’t exist as a person without a man and you’d be ostracised from society. To save her child and to give her child a proper life, she’s married to her rapist because that’s the only option.

To read the entire interview head on over to Collapse Board…

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2 Comments

  1. […] about what she believes, Louise was recently featured in an article on sexism alongside artists Kate Nash and Rose Elinor McDougall (The Pipettes). Louise has given ConversatiosWithBianca.com an exclusive […]

  2. […] more real, more palatable and important to you when you really experience sexism,” she told the blog, Conversations with Bianca. “You grow up a bit and you’re taken out of the […]

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